RECOGNIZING MANNY PACQUIAO’S GREATNESS

July 9th, 2012 By Pedro Fernandez

LONG TIME SINCE MANNY PACQUIAO INTRODUCTION

Manny Pacquiao-Shance Mosley

San Francisco, CA- When I first saw Manny Pacquiao in the flesh, it was prior to his fight with Agapito “Mr. Foul” Sanchez in 2001. Never could I imagine that this little Filipino would end up reaching the heights that he has both as a boxer and Filipino Congressman. Often I chide him over his shortcomings, but today, July 10, 2012, you have to acknowledge the advances that he has made as a fighter and a citizen since he was sitting on a bench outside of Gold’s Gym in the Potrero area of San Francisco are mind-boggling. Who would have thought that a guy supposedly with one “dress” sweat suit to his name would accomplish his feats, by “dress” sweats I mean something classy with your name on the back and or front of the suit, would reach #2 on top ten paid athletes on the Forbes list.

MANY REASONS PACQUIAO HAS BEEN GREAT FOR BOXING

Before I go, 1. My verbiage is true. 2. I’m not one to kick a guy when he’s down, a position Manny Pacquiao is in, a real “no-win” situation, Whether you think he beat Tim Bradley June 9 or not. Most of you do, but I think Pacquiao took the two first two and a half minutes off in some rounds, trying to rally from his inactivity in the final 30 seconds and that is not good when you have professional judging. What he decides to do with his boxing career right now is a choice Manny and his inner sanctum will make. The Marco Antonio Barrera first fight, Pacquiao’s domination and inside the distance win was really got him on the boxing map as a potential big player per se.

GREW UP DURING FIRST MORALES FIGHT


Losing to Erik Morales in their first encounter, a fight in which Pacquiao was seriously cut, it bothered him enough for him to lose by two points. After that Pacman treated the Mexican fighter like a bar-girl from the Zona De La Rosa (The Red Zone) of Morales’ home city of Tijuana, Mexico. stopping him in two additional fights. While I won’t give accolades or beating David Diaz at 135, that *itch slapping he gave in stopping Ricky Hatton (140) in the second round was a “highlight” reel clip for historians to look at a century from now.

NOT ALL THAT IMPRESSED OF LATE

The 147 title run, and subsequently in a “catch weight” fight with Antonio Margarito for a WBC 154 lb. title at 150, it is not something I think have not been all that stellar. With his election to Congress, trying to improve the small province that he represents, a hospital, his extreme benevolence with “poor” people who come to him begging, like the Beatles at one time, Manny is God-like. He’s also an easy mark, that Manny can’t say “No” to some people because his too kind hearted for his own good.

SILENCE IS DEAFENING

His silence since the loss to Bradley one month ago today, to me means Pacquiao is in the “thought mode.” What does he do? While his best shot would to be to go back to 140 lbs. and apply his trade. Be it for one, two, maybe three fights, that’s all that’s left, Manny Pacquiao has faults, as do other boxers, but if he wants to make the most out of the time he has left, it should be at 140. A fight with Floyd Mayweather I believe would have been made I believe long ago if Manny’s promoter Bob Arum wanted it to. Maybe Arum realizes when they take off negotiating, he’d be making the concessions, something he would prefer not to ever have to do in his life, especially with Floyd Mayweather Jr.

BETTER CONDITIONING OR HE WILL LOSE AGAIN!

If he takes the Bradley rematch, Manny can’t show up looking loose, less than 100% fit, was seemingly in need of oxygen in between rounds, all of this evident in the June 9 fight. Pacquiao’s strength surge from the sixth or seventh round on was amazing to Miguel Cotto, yet against Bradley, and even Juan Manuel Marquez, Pacquiao’s never got stronger late in either the Bradley scrap or the last Marquez fight.

IS PACQUIAO TOO EASY A MARK FOR THE BEGGING?

But from street urchin to becoming a multi-division boxing champion, Congressman, and still he’s digging into his pockets for the downtrodden. This is such a noble act, but it can also result in giving away way too much, some to those undeserving, and while it may make Manny Feel good, he has to think about the future of him, his wife Jinkee and his children, all of them as well. In short, Manny Pacquiao has been an inspiration to people all over the world, not just his native Philippines.

Pedro Fernandez

COMMENTS

  1. “Zona De La Rosa (The Red Zone) = Zona Rosa, no “de la” in it, and literal translation is not ‘Red Zone’ but “Pink Zone.’

    Michael Kranich on July 9th, 2012 at 2:40 AM
  2. good article Pedro and you made some good points,and we should enjoy the fighters because they all get old one day, enjoy it while it lasts…

    Mario on July 9th, 2012 at 7:07 AM
  3. Who would have ever imagined the position he’s in now. Well said Pete.

    Dominic Verdin on July 9th, 2012 at 10:50 AM
  4. Mayweather may very well fight, and beat, this version of Pacuiao, but I think the entire drug accusation was nothing more than a convenient excuse to get out of fighting the 2009 version of Paqman. As great as Mayweather is, after Pacquiao’s annhiliation of De La Hoya, Hatton and Cotto, he looked set to literally wipe the floor with Mayweather’s face (or anyone else’s).

    There is a lot of hatred, jealousy (conscious and subconscious) and smoke and mirrors in boxing, and now everyone is falling off the Pacuqiao bandwagon. All I can say is that having watched the sport my entire life, Pacquiao’s rise through the ranks, from his destruction of Morales and Barerra, peaking with the aforementioned trio of De La Hoya, Hatton and Cotto, trailing off when he nearly beat Margarito to death and still shut out Shane Mosely, is unlike anything I have ever seen in boxing. I don’t think there is a historical precedent. Yes people have risen through the ranks and been successful, but never like that.

    Like I said, right now Paq is kind of out of fashion, there is a lot of ganging up on him, but I think in years to come when objectivity prevails he will always be remembered for arguably the greatest, most dominant run through the weight divisions in boxing history.

    Jon on July 9th, 2012 at 11:55 AM
  5. Well, translaion or not, they call it the “Red Zone.”

    Pedro Fernandez on July 9th, 2012 at 12:50 PM
  6. Like someone posted there is a lot of smoke and mirrors in boxing and Pacquiao seems to be the one that has benefitted the most by them. He is a great fighter but people were talking about him being the greatest ever and he was never even close to that monniker. You have to admire his rise through the weight classes but we know he had a lot of advantages in that little run of his. If we are going to start making excuses about cuts during a fight where are the excuses for JMM who got badly cut by a headbutt in the second fight? I never heard JMM his team or any of his fans making excuses and that fight was a lot closer than the first fight with Morales was! Do you think he would have fought De La Hoya, Mosley or Margarito in their primes at welter? Hell no! They would have killed him! He really didn’t do much at 135 or 140 so I won’t comment on that. Remember after he beat down Cotto his team was saying that no matter what weight they fought in they would beat Cotto! What happened this last time he didn’t want none of Cotto at 154 and ended up having to fight Bradley for considerably less. Like I said great fighter but not as good as people made him out to be or wanted him to be.

    TT on July 9th, 2012 at 1:21 PM
  7. Pedro, I’ll just act as if you never wrote this…half joking. Good for Pacqiao and his family. No questioning that he’s been a very successful man.

    Cheesey1 on July 9th, 2012 at 1:44 PM
  8. Whose byline is it under?

    Pedro Fernandez on July 9th, 2012 at 3:03 PM
  9. @ Pardon, but you are a typical Monday morning quarterback. Please read the article again.

    Romeo on July 9th, 2012 at 5:57 PM
  10. Thanks Pedro Fernandez.I would like to clarify on one thing about pacquiao, being God-like here in the Phils. Well, he is admired, i’m sure of that. But being God-like. No. He is admired and serves as inspiration for every Filipino for his success in his field. It gives as example of how perseverance, patience and hardwork works for those who apply it in thier lives. From rags to riches. He may not be considered the greatest boxer of all time when his carreer is over but he will be remembered well as boxer and as a person.

    wongpan on July 9th, 2012 at 7:19 PM
  11. I would say Pacquiao is ” one of the greatest boxer” of all time …. The rise of Pacman from the unprecendented flyweight division thru the Super welterweight division ,an eight division champion , regardless of weight category will have a hard time fullfilling that kind of un-imaginable run . Many of the oppositions throw a lot of hatreds,discrimination , racism and dis-respect especially manipulating the entire boxing community of negative advertisement just to downplay and put Pacquiao down . They even accused Manny of PEDS & illegals drugs to destroy his image , but nobody proved it , he is clean on every conducted drug testing…. I guess that is all part of racial discrimination … he managed to surpassed all this test of his life … at the end he will still remain as one one of the greatest fighter , regardless of what country he came & no matter hatred and discrimination they showed him … he’s still out there , they can’t ignore it … he’s the # 1 pound for pound Champion of the world….

    Dundee D on July 9th, 2012 at 9:00 PM
  12. I find it absolutely hilarious how people continue to pretend that Pacquiao somehow “tricked” Cotto into coming in at an unfair weight.

    It is one of those things that a biased person probably intentionally wrote at one point and every other person who hates Pacquiao just seized on.

    One more time: Pacquiao fought Cotto at exactly one pound less–145–than Coto’s previous fight against Michael Jennings (146). Learn it, love it, live it.

    It wasn’t until AFTER Pacuqiao wiped the ring floor with Cotto that Cotto decided he could no longer make welterweight.

    Re: DLH, people now love to say Paq targeted an old, washed up Oscar–that tricky Pacquiao!

    Only problem is, DLH was coming off giving a prime Mayweather the hardest fight of his career and came in against Pacquaio at a betting favorite of -165.

    These days everyone acts like any fool would have known that Paq, recently coming up from 130 pounds, was going to beat Oscar senseless. So, tell me, how much money did you all win on the fight, since it was so clear Oscar was washed up? Must have been a lot.

    Jon on July 10th, 2012 at 5:58 AM
  13. No Pedro, we dont call La Zona Rosa “Red Zone”. “Red Zone” is only utilized for prostitution areas and if you were familiar with Mexico City, you would know that La Zona Rosa is one of the most beautiful areas in the whole country with its quaint buildings, typical restaurants and the mariachis and mimes entertaining people on the streets.

    Stop being stubborn and accept being corrected when you dont know what you are talking about.

    And by the way, there are prostitutes all over Mexico City. But you probably already knew that.

    A Mexican.

    Antonio on July 10th, 2012 at 6:21 AM
  14. im a pacquiao fan but if ever pacquiao and mayweather will fight and if pacquiao will show the same skill during his 3 recent fights…i dont think he will win against mayweather…no way….P.S. i still saw pacquiao won against bradley and marquez..

    moo on July 10th, 2012 at 8:12 AM
  15. Boxing has a long history and so many outstanding fighters.
    I believe Pacquiao is the Greatest Pound-For-Pound fighter of the last 25 years.
    I think you have to go all the way back to the mid-80s and a prime Julio Cesar Chavez or a prime Mike Tyson, or even earlier with Duran, Leonard, Hagler, and Hearns to make any argument.

    the bradguy on July 10th, 2012 at 10:19 AM
  16. In TJ, it’s where we danced all night, it was the Red Zone. In Mexico City the Zone rocked as well.

    Pedro Fernandez on July 10th, 2012 at 10:21 AM
  17. What is your hidden agenda here Pedro? You pretend to acknowledge Pacquiao’s greatness exposing your inconsistency. Did you not state in one of your articles earlier that Pacquiao is a joke. Are you not just inviting your legion of pac haters to contradict this article with an approving “I told you so”.Be true to yourself Pedro.

    Jeffrey on July 12th, 2012 at 8:56 PM
  18. Fair & Balanced, Passhole!

    Pedro Fernandez on July 12th, 2012 at 9:44 PM
  19. Fair and balanced, I agree. To expect Pac to TRULY dominate at the heavier weight classes is far too much for anyone to expect, he is only HUMAN. As fight fans we want to see great fighters go up in the ring against each other — but all too often there is a disparity in size. Weight classes exist for very good reasons, athlete safety being among them (as an extreme example, allowing Ricardo Lopez to go up against Lennox Lewis at their natural weights would be grossly negligent). Understandably, Pac and company have seeked to “level the playing field” a bit by fighting at catch weights and taking on fighters out of their prime. This “happy medium” is the only PRACTICAL way to compensate for the inherent “handicap” of size, otherwise we would never see the fight happen. All performance elements being EQUAL (speed, reflexes, skill, etc.), the one with the SIZE advantage wins. No way Pac beats the Shane Mosley that beat Oscar in their first fight. Something needs to give, and if NOT size then it’s an element of performance, i.e. an out-of-prime fighter. But this is NOT to take away from what Pac has done in the sport of boxing — the guy has GUTS and a real fighting spirit. Name another small guy who is willing risk punishment from those bigger guys (the risk can be career ending), albeit catch weights and out of prime opponents. I don’t see very many talented fighters (Mayweather included) going up regularly against naturally bigger opposition (Jon also makes some good points above regarding Cotto and ODLH). They are few and far between, and to acknowledge Pac’s accomplishments as a great fighter is legit.

    Paco on July 14th, 2012 at 1:38 PM
  20. Paco, I agree with your statement on being fair and balanced but not Pedro’s. Even his language reveal his character. He cannot take criticism without resorting to vulgarities!

    Jeffrey on July 14th, 2012 at 4:38 PM

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